Bridgend Male Choir Choristers' Website
 

  Keeping up to date

Learning Aid (for sectional learning) 

 

 http://www.cotswoldmvc.org/html/our_music.html  

      

Scroll down the page to  'Instructions How To Play/ Download' 

OR  Just click on your song & your part e.g. T2


thanks Gareth


So you can't Sing.....

Many people say the same thing: you could share the following aide memoire with them


I can’t sing! Aha, this old chestnut! Yes, you can. Everyone can. A common complaint heard from many people who are very happy to sing around the house for their own pleasure but would hate to ‘inflict’ their horrible voice on other people. Of course, everyone can sing. Not necessarily in the same way or to the same standard, but they can sing nevertheless.


I’m too embarrassed and frightened to sing in front of others This is understandable if someone has not sung in the company of others for a long time. always to point out that everyone else probably feels the same and that nobody will be put on the spot or asked to sing solo.
I think that ‘choirs’ are formal, stuffy The word ‘choir’ does conjure up images of endless school assemblies or long church services or rows of posh people dressed up and standing stiffly singing music that we can’t really relate to. However, there are many, many different kinds of ‘choir’ out there and there will be one to suit every taste.


It will be full of old people! Yes, it’s true: many established choirs tend to consist mainly of people over 40. This can put off younger singers. However, from my experience, I’ve worked with groups whose ages range from 18 to 80 and it’s simply not an issue as everyone is connected by their common love of singing.


I won’t know the songs When joining an established choir it will almost certainly already have a repertoire of songs. However, in a one-day workshop, everyone will be in the same boat as all the songs will be fresh and new. Even if someone does know a song already, they certainly won’t know the particular harmony arrangement. In fact, it’s often harder to learn an arrangement of a song if you know the melody already.


I’m too busy and certainly don’t have the time to make a regular commitment This mainly comes from blokes I have to say. I guess many men put their jobs before their own pleasure and leisure. It’s strange how we have many women in choirs who have high-powered jobs and families, yet they manage to find the time to come and sing.


Singing together is old-fashioned and usually religious or classical It may seem to be old-fashioned, but that doesn’t detract from the fun and enjoyment that can be had. Dancing is old-fashioned too and has been around for millennia!


I’m terrible at remembering words and tunes Aren't we all! Many people don’t like being in that strange state where they don’t quite know what they are doing and are a bit lost. It’s not a nice feeling. But you have to be patient and allow plenty of time to get a tune and the words under your belt. It’s about trusting the process and making mistakes as you become more familiar with a song.


I’m too scared to perform in public, I just want to have fun This is understandable if someone has not sung in the company of others for a long time. always to point out that everyone else probably feels the same and that nobody will be put on the spot or asked to sing solo.


I can’t sing! Yes, you can. Everyone can    Aha, this old chestnut! A common complaint heard from many people who are very happy to sing around the house for their own pleasure but would hate to ‘inflict’ their horrible voice on other people. Of course, everyone can sing. Not necessarily in the same way or to the same standard, but they can sing nevertheless. Remember, it’s not what you’ve got, it’s how you use it!


This article has been compiled from various internet sources                                     GH 09/11/17

Never Sing Louder Than Lovely

Focusing on three aspects: team work, listening skills and humour.

 

Don’t be a prima donna: choirs are all about team work; remember what it was like when you first joined the choir; help out new members. If someone in your part is struggling, don’t feel a cut above because you’ve nailed it; help them out gently.

 

I believe that everyone can sing and that, given time, everyone in the choir can get to the same high standard. However, to get to that level performance, instead of focusing on the production of the voice, you need to pay more attention to what you are hearing. Using your self-awareness, you can begin to hear when you are getting the notes right and when you are not. Listening to others in your part will help you stay in time, blend better and work as a unit. Reaching out to hear the other parts will help you stay in tune, enjoy and get a better understanding of how harmony works. And finally, listening to what the director has to say can only be a good thing!

 

It’s no good relying on Ryan to give you feedback all the time. It’s also no good to just focus on those singers around you. It’s much more gratifying and entertaining to reach out and try to get a sense of the whole choir. Hear the harmonies working, check the blend, get the volume balance of each part right. Feel part of a creative team.

 

However, having a sense of humour is the most important aspect of all. Keep smiling when all around you are struggling. Laugh off the umpteenth time that Ryan has pointed out that you’re getting a phrase wrong. Find the humour in the man standing next to you who constantly sings the wrong note – loudly! Relax, be playful, make it fun. After all, although you take the whole choir thing seriously, it’s only a bit of singing!


Dame Isobel Baillie, DBE (9 March 1895 – 24 September 1983)  Scottish soprano

(GH 2017)


A well-behaved bunch? – yes, we are!

Choristers are a notoriously well-behaved bunch: they know how to have a good time and can be 'good choristers' as well.

 

Consider the following and decide if this is how it could all happen.

 

We listen: choristers must have good listening skills; they need to listen to the conductor; listen to fellow choristers; sound like one harmonious group, and not battle it out like a bunch of soloists wanting to sound the loudest!


We learn: we make note of errors with pencil NEVER with PEN; always have a pencil and eraser handy; we learn from these errors and attempt not to repeat them.


We practice: no matter how great you think you are, practising never hurt anyone; a good chorister does his best to be prepared by practising in his own time; from time to time there are always passages in music that seem elusive. But we learn to overcome.


We appreciate: some compositions we get to sing arouse us with its beautiful sounds; our conductor inspires and leads us through the passages; our accompanist is sympathetic and gives impetus to the choir; we appreciate each other; the beauty comes from our voices joining together to turn notes on pages into a pleasurable performance.


We perform: a good chorister, a good choir, sings with a controlled passion but looks thrilled in doing it.

 

Choristers are performers and it is through our enthusiasm that we guide and help an audience to appreciate the music being heard.

 

20 Uchaf Emynau Cymru / Top 20 Best Loved Welsh Hymns

An excellent recording of some of the Favourite hymns available from Amazon 

M. Eddie Evans                     Pantyfedwen ("Tydi a wnaeth y wyrth")

Jean Sibelius                         Finlandia Hymn for chorus & organ (or harmonium), Op113/12

J. Haydn Phillips                    Bro Aber ("O tyred i'n gwaredu")

R. Lowry                                Dim ond Iesu ("O fy Iesu bendigedig")

W.J. Evans                            Rhys ("Rho im yr hedd")

Cesar Malan                          Lausanne ("Iesu, Iesu, rwyt ti'n ddigon")

John Hughes                         Calon lân (A pure heart)

John Hughes                         Cwm Rhondda, Welsh hymn ("Wele'n sefyll rhwng y myrtwydd")

David Jenkins                       Builth ("Rhagluniaeth fawr y nef")

Daniel Protheroe                   Price ("I Galfaria trof fy wyneb")

William Arnold                       Sarah ("Mi glywaf dyner Iais")

D. Christmas Williams           Clawdd Madog ("Os gwelir fi bechadur")

Joseph Parry                        Sirioldeb ("Un fendith dyro im")

John Hughes                        Arwelfa ("Arglweydd gad im dawel orffwys"), hymn

Matthew W. Davies              Godre'r Coed ("Tydi wyt deilwng fyth o'm cân")

R.L. Jones                            Coedmor ("Pan oedd Iesu dan yr hoelion")

Caradog Roberts                  Rachie ("I bob un sy'n ffyddlon")

Caradog Roberts                  Im Memoriam ("Arglwydd Iesu, arwain f'enaid")

Osborne Roberts                  "Pennant ("Dyma gariad fel y moroedd")

John Francis                         Ty Ddewi ("Mi dafla 'maich)